Let’s take a fresh look at “Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sinned against us”

Monday, February 25, 2012, Part 2

“In this manner, therefore, pray: Our Father in heaven, hallowed be Your name. Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors” (Matthew 6:9-12).

IDEA: When people think of someone doing wrong, “righteous people” seldom think of themselves.

PURPOSE: To help listeners realize that when they pray about others, they may be praying for themselves.

Do you remember times when you were a child, having someone ask you, “Whose fault is it?”

Do you remember how you responded?

I. When you read about the Good Samaritan, whom would you say was at fault in that situation?

Did the priest or the Levite bear any fault in the situation?

How would they have talked about the mugging to their friends or family or congregation that evening?

Whom do you think the lawyer (who asked, “Who is my neighbor?” at the start of the story) felt was at fault for what had taken place?

II. Suppose there was a meeting to form “The Jericho Road Protection Society” and only two or three people bothered to show up, would any of the others have been at fault for what happened?

Is it possible to be at fault by doing nothing or must it always be an action that makes us guilty?

Is it possible to look out the window at the sins that others commit and feel morally superior to them?

Do we pray for forgiveness for sins because It is “the thing to do” but not really believe we need it?

III. Have you ever prayed the Lord’s Prayer without thinking about what you were asking? Why?

Have you ever prayed this petition and really prayed it? What made the difference?